• A collaborative program of research among election teams

    Module 1 (1996-2001) focused on the impact of electoral institutions on political behavior, the nature of cleavages and alignments, and the evaluation of democratic processes.

  • A collaborative program of research among election teams

    Module 2 (2001-2006) focused on representation and accountability via three key theoretical questions about accountability, engagement, and the institutional context for decision-making.

  • A collaborative program of research among election teams

    Module 3 (2006-2011) focused on perceptions of, assessments of, and responses to the variety and quality of political choices in an election. To what degree political systems provide meaningful alternatives and electoral competition?

  • A collaborative program of research among election teams

    Module 4 (2011-2016) focused on distributional politics and social protection, with a goal of revealing voter preferences for policies that affect income and wealth distribution.

  • A collaborative program of research among election teams

    Module 5 (2016-2021) focuses on citizens’ perceptions of political elites and out-groups, and the implications for electoral democracy.

Module 1 Module 5

Updates

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October 14, 2019

The Election Studies table and the Variable Tables have been updated.

August 19, 2019

CSES Announcement: Special 25th Anniversary Events at APSA

March 7, 2019

Produced a new logo variant to celebrate the 25th anniversary year of the CSES.

December 4, 2018

The CSES Bibliography has been updated. It now contains over 1,000 citations.

November 15, 2018

Posted membership list and contact information for the CSES Module 6 Planning Committee.

June 11, 2018

Added Comparative Agendas Project (CAP) to list of Other Comparative Projects.

May 29, 2018

Given the Full Release of CSES Module 4, the list of Module 4 collaborators collaborators and table of participating election studies have both been updated.

May 2, 2018

Posted new page listing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

Because of CSES, we know that…

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Globalization increases electoral fairness.

Voters are not only concerned about party positions, but also policy outcomes.

Inequality undermines public goods provision.

Adverse economic conditions motivate political participation.