CSES Module 3: 2006-2011 Errata

Updates and error corrections.

CURRENT ERRATA

Errata listed in this section apply to the current version of CSES Module 3, and users should consider whether to apply the items to their files.

CSES Module 3 errata discovered with Full Release of December 15, 2015, in the development of CSES IMD Phase 2

CSES Module 3: Dataset & Codebook Errata

 

Posted: October 17, 2019

Errata discovered with Full Release of December 15, 2015,

in the development of CSES IMD Phase 2

 

With the release of the second phase of CSES Integrated Module Dataset (IMD), the CSES Secretariat identified some issues with CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015. Below, we provide a list of these issues that users of CSES Module 3 (release date: December 15, 2015) in the future may wish to take note of concerning analyses.

 

  • VARIABLE C2001 (AGE OF RESPONDENT): For United States (2008) there is a code 1 in the CSES Module 3 dataset, with meaning “1. 90 years or older.” This remains unchanged for the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the code has been recoded into 90, with the same meaning, for variable IMD2001_1 (AGE OF RESPONDENTS – IN YEARS) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C3010_B-C (LIKE-DISLIKE – LEADERS B and C): For Mexico (2006) there is data about leaders B and C in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but there is no information, neither in the data nor in the CSES Module 3 Codebook, to whom this data refers. The new look at the Mexico (2006) study revealed that these are:

Leader B – Andreas Manuel Lopez Obrador (Party of Democratic Revolution)

Leader C – Roberto Madraza (Institutional Revolutionary Party)

This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the leaders B and C are now documented in the CSES IMD Codebook.

 

  • VARIABLE C3023_PR_1 (CURRENT ELECTION – VOTE CHOICE – PRESIDENT): For the Philippines (2010) there are four respondents coded 20. There is no information about the meaning of this code neither in the data nor in the CSES Module 3 Codebook. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this code is recoded into “9999999. Missing” for the variable IMD3002_PR_1 (CURRENT PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE – ROUND 1) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C3023_LH_ (CURRENT ELECTION – VOTE CHOICE – LOWER HOUSE): For Ireland (2007), the vote choice has been coded as Party List vote, under the variable C3023_LH_PL (CURRENT ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE LOWER HOUSE – PARTY LIST), while voters in Ireland cast district candidate vote. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the vote choice for Ireland (2007) has been coded into IMD3002_LH_DC (CURRENT LOWER HOUSE ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE – DISTRICT CANDIDATE) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C3023_UH_ (CURRENT ELECTION – VOTE CHOICE – UPPER HOUSE): For Brazil (2006), the vote choice has been coded as Party List vote, under the variable C3023_UH_PL (CURRENT ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE LOWER HOUSE – PARTY LIST), while voters in Brazil cast district candidate vote for Upper house elections. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the vote choice for Brazil (2006) has been coded into IMD3002_UH_DC (CURRENT UPPER HOUSE ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE – DISTRICT CANDIDATE) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C3023_UH_DC_3 (CURRENT ELECTION – VOTE CHOICE – UPPER HOUSE – DISTRICT CANDIDATE 3): For Poland (2005) there is one respondent coded 63. There is no information about the meaning of this code neither in the data nor in the CSES Module 3 Codebook.

This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this code is recoded into “9999999. Missing” for the variable IMD3002_UH_DC_3 (CURRENT UPPER HOUSE ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE – DISTRICT CANDIDATE 3) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLES C3023_ (ALL VOTE CHOICE VARIABLES) and C3023_3 (WHICH PARTY DO YOU FEEL CLOSEST TO): For Taiwan (2008) study in the CSES Module 3 Codebook Appendix, the Kuomintang (KMT) party is listed as PARTY B with the numerical code 1. The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) is listed as PARTY A with the numerical party code 2. However, for all vote choice variables and party identification variables, except C3032_PR_1 (CURRENT ELECTION – VOTE CHOICE – PRESIDENT), the numerical party code 1 refers to the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in the data. The numerical party code 2 refers to the Kuomintang (KMT) party. This is a documentation error. For C3032_PR_1, the data were coded according to the party labels in the CSES Module 3 Codebook. Hence, the numerical party code 2 refers to the DPP, and the numerical party code 1 refers to the KMT. Throughout the CSES Module 3 dataset, variables related to the alphabetical code PARTY B refer to the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and variables related to the alphabetical code PARTY A refers to the Kuomintang (KMT) party. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the issue was addressed and corrected for the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C3023_3 (WHICH PARTY DO YOU FEEL CLOSEST TO): For Ireland (2007) the data in this variable is incorrect and there are only 40 eligible cases on this variable for Ireland (2007) study in the CSES Module 3. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but the variable IMD3005_3 (PARTY IDENTIFICATION: WHO) is coded as “999999. MISSING” for Ireland (2007) in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Czech Republic (2006 and 2010). This code is not correct because Vaclav Klaus (ODS) was President before and after the respective elections. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “2030002. Civic Democratic Party (ODS)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Czech Republic (2006 and 2010).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Estonia (2011). This code is not correct because Toomas Hendrik Ilves (SDE) was President before and after the Estonian 2011 election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “2330003. Social Democratic Party (SDE)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 for Estonia (2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) is coded “1” for France (2007). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for France (2007) refers to the Green Party (Les Verts). However, Jacques Chirac (UMP) was President before the French 2007 Presidential election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “2500001. Union for a Popular Movement (UMP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for France (2007).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Germany (2005). This code is not correct because Horst Koehler (CDU) was President before and after the German 2005 election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “2760002. Christian Democratic Union (CDU)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Germany (2005).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Greece (2009). This code is not correct because Karolos Papoulias (PASOK) was President before and after the 2009 Greek election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “3000001. Pan-Hellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 for Greece (2009).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Israel (2006). This code is not correct because Moshe Katsav (Likud) was President before and after the 2006 Israeli election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “3760001. Likud – The Consolidation (L)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Israel (2006).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ MISSING” for Portugal (2009). This code is not correct because Anibal Cavaco Silva (PSD) was President before and after the 2009 Portuguese election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “6200001. Social Democratic Party (PSD)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Portugal (2009).

 

  • VARIABLES C5007 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE) and C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) are coded “ NOT applicable” for Turkey (2011). This code is not correct because Abdullah Gul (AKP) was President before and after the 2011 Turkish election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these variables are coded “7920001. Justice and Development Party (AKP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 for Turkey (2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5008 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER BEFORE) is coded “1” for France (2007). This numerical code in CSES Module 3 for France (2007) refers to Green Party (Les Verts). However, Dominique de Villepin (UMP) was Prime Minister before the French 2007 Presidential election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “2500001. Union for a Popular Movement (UMP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 for France 2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5008 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER BEFORE) is coded “97. not applicable” for Peru (2011). The coding is not correct because Rosario Fernandez (Peruvian Aprista Party – PAP) was Prime Minister prior to the 2011 Peruvian general election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “6040026. Peruvian Aprista Party (PAP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Peru 2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5008 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER BEFORE) is coded “97. not applicable” for South Korea (2008). The coding is not correct because Han Seung-soo (Grand National Party – known as Grand National Party until 2012) was Prime Minister before and after the 2008 South Korean election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “4100001. New Frontier Party (NFP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for South Korea (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5008 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER BEFORE) is coded “6” for Poland (2007). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for Poland (2007) refers to Civic Platform (PO). However, Jaroslaw Kaczynski (PiS) was Prime Minister before the Polish 2007 election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “6160002. Law and Justice (PiS)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Poland (2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5008 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER BEFORE) is coded “2” for Slovenia (2008). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for Slovenia (2008) refers to Liberal Democracy of Slovenia (LDS). However, Janez Jansa (SDS) was Prime Minister before the 2008 election in Slovenia. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “7050001. Slovenian Democratic Party (SDS)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Slovenia (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5011 (PARTY OF THE PRESIDENT AFTER) is coded “1” for France (2007). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for France (2007) refers to the Green Party (Les Verts). However, Nicolas Sarkozy (UMP) was President after the French 2007 Presidential election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “2500001. Union for a Popular Movement (UMP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for France (2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “1” for France (2007). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for France (2007) refers to the Green Party (Les Verts). However, François Fillon (UMP) was Prime Minister after the 2007 French Presidential election.

This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “2500001. Union for a Popular Movement (UMP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for France (2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “ NOT applicable” for Peru (2011). This code is not correct because Salomón Lerner Ghitis, the former campaign manager of the 2011 Peru Wins alliance, became Prime Minister after the 2011 Peruvian general election.This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “6040050. Peru Wins (UPP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Peru (2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “ NOT applicable” for South Korea (2008). This code is not correct because Han Seung-soo (Grand National Party) was Prime Minister before and after the 2008 South Korean election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “4100001. New Frontier Party (NFP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for South Korea (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “8” for Poland (2007). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for Poland (2007) refers to the Polish Peasant Party (PSL). However, Donald Tusk (PO) became Prime Minister after the Polish 2007 election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “ Civic Platform” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Poland (2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “1” for Slovenia (2008). This numerical code in CSES module 3 for Slovenia (2008) refers to the Democratic Party of Pensioners (DeSUS). However, Borut Pahor (SD) became Prime Minister after the 2008 Slovenian election. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “7050002. Social Democrats (SD)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Slovenia (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5012 (PARTY OF THE PRIME MINISTER AFTER) is coded “ NOT applicable” for South Korea (2008). This code is not correct because Han Seung-soo (Grand National Party) was Prime Minister before and after the 2008 South Korean election.

This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this variable is coded “4100001.  New Frontier Party (NFP)” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for South Korea (2008).

 

  • VARIABLES C5016_F (IDEOLOGICAL FAMILY – PARTY F) and C5016_G (IDEOLOGICAL FAMILY – PARTY G) are coded “8. Christian Democratic Parties,” for Finland (2007). The party F for Finland (2007) refers to Swedish People’s Party in Finland, while party G refers to Christian Democrats (KD). After consulting Macro Report, these two parties should have been coded “12. ETHNIC PARTIES.”

These errors remain in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but both of these variables are coded “12. ETHNIC PARTIES” in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, for Finland (2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5038_2 (VOTES CAST – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “97. NOT APPLICABLE” for Norway (2005 and 2009). However, the Norwegian Parliament comprises 169 seats in two tiers. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 this variable is coded “91. OTHER (SEE ELECTION STUDY NOTES)” for Norway (2005 and 2009).

 

  • VARIABLE C5038_3 (VOTES CAST – UPPER – 1ST SEGMENT) is coded “1” for Poland (2005 and 2007). In Upper House Election in Poland, voters have as many votes as there are candidates to be elected in a district (between 1 and 4). In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “91. OTHER (SEE ELECTION STUDY NOTES)” for Poland (2005 and 2007).

 

  • VARIABLE C5039_1 (VOTING PROCEDURE – LOWER – 1ST SEGMENT) is coded “1. CANDIDATES” for Peru (2011). Voters in Peru cast one vote for a party list, but they can also express a preferential vote for some specific candidate, though not many voters do that. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “2. PARTY LISTS” for Peru (2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5039_2 (VOTING PROCEDURE – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “7. NOT APPLICABLE” for Norway (2005 and 2009). Norway is a two-tier system, and voters cast one single vote based on party lists. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “2. PARTY LISTS” for Norway (2005 and 2009).

 

  • VARIABLE C5040_1 (VOTING ROUNDS – LOWER – 1ST SEGMENT) is coded “2” for Belarus (2008). Even though the second round is possible in the election, in 2008 all 110 deputies were elected in the first round of election. Thus, the number of rounds in the election should be 1. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “1” for Belarus (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5040_2 (VOTING ROUNDS – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “2” for Hong Kong (2008). However, in geographical constituencies, which are considered to be the second segment of the system, there is only one round of voting. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “1” for Hong Kong (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5040_2 (VOTING ROUNDS – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “97. NOT APPLICABLE” for Norway (2005 and 2009). Voters in Norway cast only a single ballot, even though their vote directly impacts the selection of 150 members from 19 multi-member districts using proportional representation but also influences the dispersion of the 19 “member at large seats.” In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “1” for Norway (2005 and 2009).

 

  • VARIABLE C5044_ (COMPULSORY VOTING – LOWER – 1st AND 2nd SEGMENT): For Mexico (2006 and 2009) these two variables were coded as “5. NO” indicating that Mexico did not have compulsory voting for the lower house elections. This is not correct, and the correct code for the two election studies is “3. YES; WITHOUT SANCTION FOR VIOLATION.” This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but this is corrected for the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C5046_1 (PARTY THRESHOLD – LOWER – 1ST SEGMENT) is coded “5” for South Africa (2009). However, South Africa is one national district with a magnitude of four hundred, and there is no legal threshold for gaining representation. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “0” for South Africa (2009).

 

  • VARIABLES C5046_2 (PARTY THRESHOLD – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) and C5046_3 (PARTY THRESHOLD – UPPER – 1ST SEGMENT) are coded “7” for Canada (2008). Canada is using “first-past-the-post” system, which is a one-tier system, and the 2008 study does not concern the Upper house election.In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, these variables are coded “97. NOT APPLICABLE” for Canada (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5046_2 (PARTY THRESHOLD – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “5” for New Zealand (2008). New Zealand has an alternative threshold; parties can obtain seats by winning 5% of total votes nationally, or by winning one of the 70 constituency seats.In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019 this variable is coded “96. OTHER THRESHOLD (SEE ELECTION STUDY NOTES)” for New Zealand (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5046_2 (PARTY THRESHOLD – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT) is coded “5” for South Korea (2008). South Korea has an alternative threshold; parties can obtain seats by winning 3% of total votes nationally, or by winning at least 5 primary district seats. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “96. OTHER THRESHOLD (SEE ELECTION STUDY NOTES)” for South Korea (2008).

 

  • VARIABLE C5046_3 (PARTY THRESHOLD – UPPER – 1ST SEGMENT) is coded “0” for Ireland (2007). However, members of the Upper house in Ireland are indirectly elected. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, this variable is coded “97. NOT APPLICABLE” for Ireland (2007).

 

  • VARIABLES C5046_3 (PARTY THRESHOLD – UPPER – 1ST SEGMENT) and C5046_3 (PARTY THRESHOLD – UPPER – 1ST SEGMENT) are coded “7” for Peru (2011). Peru has a unicameral Parliament. In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, this error persists. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, these variables are coded “97. NOT APPLICABLE” for Peru (2011).

 

  • VARIABLE C5052 (AGE OF THE CURRENT REGIME): There are several anomalies concerning this variable, including:
    1. For Czech Republic (2010), the data is coded “16”. The data should reflect the last regime change in the country, which, according to PolityIV happened in 1993.
    2. for Denmark (2007) the data is coded “61”.The data should reflect the last regime change in the country, which according to PolityIV happened in 1945.
    3. For New Zealand (2008) the data is coded “135”. The data should reflect the last regime change in the country, which, according to PolityIV happened in 1877.
    4. For Netherlands (2006) the data is coded “60”. The data should reflect the last regime change in the country, which, according to PolityIV happened in 1945.
    5. For Netherlands (2010), the data is coded “64”. The data should reflect the last regime change in the country which, according to PolityIV happened in 1945.

    In the last Full Release of CSES Module 3 dated December 15, 2015, these errors persist. However, in the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019, these variables are corrected.

 

  • VARIABLE C5057 (PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS ELECTORAL FORMULA): For Estonia (2011), Greece (2009) and Hong Kong (2008) this variable is coded as missing in CSES Module 3, while the correct code should be “Not Applicable.” This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but these studies are coded as “7. Not Applicable” in the variable IMD5014 (ELECTORAL FORMULA: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION) for the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

  • VARIABLE C5057 (PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS ELECTORAL FORMULA): For Thailand (2007), this variable is coded as “5. Single Transferable Vote” in CSES Module 3, while the correct code should be “Not Applicable,” because Thailand does not have a president. This error remains in the CSES Module 3 Full Release of December 15, 2015, but Thailand (2007) is coded as “7. Not Applicable” in the variable IMD5014 (ELECTORAL FORMULA: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION) for the CSES IMD Release of October 17, 2019.

 

CSES Module 3 Full Release: December 15, 2015 Version

CSES Module 3 Full Release: Data Set Errata
Posted: December 15, 2015

Updates made to the Full Release of December 15, 2015, since the Full Release of March 27, 2013

The files released on December 15, 2015 are an update to the prior release of March 27. 2013. Please do not use files from the previous release with files from the current release. Variable names and attributes, as well as the data, have sometimes been changed. However, no records were removed nor added. The respondent, country, and election study count remain the same.

With this release, the data and syntax file formats, and the codebook, have been improved to be more consistent with other CSES data releases. Furthermore, newly accompanying the release are datasets already prepared and ready to be immediately loaded into R, SAS, SPSS, and STATA. The dataset has also been made available in CSV format (albeit without metadata beyond variable names in the column headers).

Last, a number of corrections were made to known issues in the data and documentation. The CSES user community originally made us aware of many of these issues, and we thank you for that feedback. A list of some of the most important changes made is as follows, though this is not a comprehensive list of all changes:

For Poland (2007), the coding of variable C3032_LH_PL (PREVIOUS ELECTION: VOTE CHOICE LOWER HOUSE – PARTY LIST) was corrected to now correspond to the Party table for Poland (2007).

For the Ireland (2007) election study, the value labels of the four variables concerning ‘Most important problem’ (C3001_1-C3002_2) were added to the codebook. Furthermore, the missing codes of these variables have been adjusted to the CSES standard. An election study note specifying the value labels has been included in the codebook.

For Czech Republic (2010), an error in the number of portfolios after election assigned to parties A, B and C (variables C5013_A, C5013_B and C5013_C – NUMBER OF PORTFOLIOS AFTER) has been corrected.

For Poland (2005), the value labels of the two variables C3002_1 and C3002_2 (MOST IMPORTANT PROBLEM-SOCIOTROPIC) have been added to the codebook.

Variable C5037 (MULTI-PARTY ENDORSEMENTS ON BALLOT) was recoded from ‘3. YES, CANDIDATE’S NAME APPEARS ONCE, TOGETHER WITH THE NAMES OF ALL SUPPORTING PARTIES’ to ‘1. NO’ for the Polish election studies of both 2005 and 2007.

For Ireland (2007), variable C5065 (ELECTORAL FORMULA – LOWEST SEGMENT (TIER) – LOWER HOUSE has been recoded to ’32. PR – LARGEST REMAINDER – DROOP’ instead of ’33. PR – LARGEST REMAINDER – HARE’.

For Japan (2007), variable C5067 (AVERAGE DISTRICT MAGNITUDE – SECOND TIER – LOWER HOUSE) has been recoded to 16.36.

The variable C5054 (REGIME: TYPE OF EXECUTIVE) was recoded from ‘2. MIXED DEMOCRACY’ to ‘1. PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY’ for the Icelandic election studies of 2007 and 2009.

For Taiwan (2008), variable C5041_1 (PARTY LISTS – LOWER – 1ST SEGMENT (TIER) was recoded from code 1. CLOSED to 7. NA, as this concerns a FPTP System. Furthermore, variable C5047_2 (UNIT FOR THE THRESHOLD – LOWER – 2ND SEGMENT (TIER) is not missing anymore but now contains a value for this election study.

The following note was added to the variable notes of C5093-C5096 (concerning the effective number of electoral parties) to mention that data can refer to upper house elections as well, in order to accommodate the Japanese election study: The electoral data employed to calculate this index comes from lower house elections, unless the study is focused on upper house election exclusively.

The following party codes have been added to the party table for Slovenia (2008): 09. United List of Social Democrats (ZLSD), 10. Slovenian People’s Party (SLS), 11. Youth Party of Slovenia (SMS).

All Irish cases were coded ‘000. NOT APPLICABLE’ for variable C4003 (NUMBER OF PARTY LISTS IN DISTRICT), as Ireland does not employ party lists.

The alphabetical country codes of Romania and Hong-Kong in Module 3 were corrected. They now read ROU_2009 and HKG_2008.

For Sweden (2006), variable C5055 (NUMBER OF MONTHS SINCE LAST LOWER HOUSE ELECTION) was recoded 48, as Sweden switched to having elections every four years from 1998 onwards.

For both the German elections of 2005 and 2009, variables C4004_A-C4004_G (PERCENT VOTE IN DISTRICT – PARTY X) had been coded according to election outcomes of the ‘second vote’. This has been corrected to refer to the ‘first vote’ instead, as these votes are actually counted on the district level. As a consequence, also the variable C4005 (TURNOUT IN DISTRICT) has been recoded for both Germany (2005) and Germany (2009) as the turnouts for the ‘first vote’ and ‘second vote’ differ slightly. In accordance with these changes, C4003 was coded ‘000. NOT APPLICABLE’ for Germany (2009) and data was added for C4002 (NUMBER OF CANDIDATES IN DISTRICT) for Germany (2005).

The Latvian collaborator asked only one Party Identification question which was decided to be coded into variable C3020_1 (ARE YOU CLOSE TO ANY POLITICAL PARTY) instead of C3020_2 (DO YOU FEEL CLOSER TO ONE PARTY) where it was coded before. C3020_2 was set to missing.

We have inserted values for variable C4002 for the election studies Brazil (2006) and Brazil (2010). As the Brazilian electoral system employs open lists, both variable C4003 (NUMBER OF PARTY LISTS IN DISTRICT) and C4002 (NUMBER OF CANDIDATES IN DISTRICT) apply and should contain data.

Variables C5002_A to C5002_D (PERCENT SEATS – LOWER HOUSE) were corrected for Australia (2007).

The election study note for Austria (2008) for variables C3002_1-C3002_2 (MOST IMPORTANT PROBLEM-SOCIOTROPIC) now also mentions the code ‘010. Unemployment’.

The variable C2028 (RACE) has been recoded for the Mexico (2006) election study to now be consistent with Mexico (2009). An election study note has been added.

Due to a processing error, the macro variables were wrongly coded for Estonia (2011). They were recoded to now contain the correct values, corresponding to the Estonian macro report.

Peru (2011), Chile (2009), and Turkey (2011) had invalid missing codes (999) for macro variables C5016 (IDEOLOGICAL FAMILY) and C5017 (LEFT-RIGHT – PARTY X). These codes were recoded to the valid missing code (99) for these variables.

The coding for the variable C5074 (FUSED VOTE) for the Slovenia (2008) study has been changed, from ‘5. NO’ into ‘7. NOT APPLICABLE’.

For variable C5065 (ELECTORAL FORMULA – LOWEST SEGMENT (TIER)), both Brazilian election studies (2006 and 2010) used a non-labelled, invalid code 14. This has been corrected and is now coded ’31. PR – D’HONDT’.
If you have questions or concerns, e-mail us at cses@umich.edu and we would be pleased to help.

ALREADY APPLIED

The following errata have already been applied to the most recent version of the dataset, and can be ignored by users of the current version of CSES Module 3.

CSES Module 3 Full Release: March 27, 2013 Version

CSES Module 3 Data Set Errata
Posted: Mar 27, 2013

Updates made to the Full Release of March 27, 2013, since the Advance Release of May 31, 2012

CSES Module 3 Advance Release: May 31, 2012 Version

Updates made to the Advance Release of May 31, 2012, since the Advance Release of March 31, 2011

The third advance release of May 31, 2012 contain additions, updates, and improvements to the second advance release of March 31, 2011. Please do not use files from the previous release with files from the current release. Variable names and attributes, as well as the data, have sometimes been changed.

Some of the changes between the first and second advance releases are listed here, though this is not a comprehensive list:

Eight new election studies have been added to the file, bringing the number of election studies included so far in Module 3 to 37 in total. The studies added as of the third advance release are: Brazil (2010), Denmark (2007), Estonia (2011), Greece (2009), Slovakia (2010), Slovenia (2008), Spain (2008), and Uruguay (2009).
As of 2010 the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) changed the methodology it uses to create its Human Development Index (HDI). The numbers in the CSES release have been updated accordingly. Please see the codebook variable note for C5083 for more information.
In the macro data section, the coding of Norway’s electoral tiers has been changed.
If you have questions or concerns, e-mail us at cses@umich.edu and we would be pleased to help.

CSES Module 3 Advance Release: March 31, 2011 Version

Posted: March 31, 2011

Iceland (2009) – missing respondent identifier variable

In the second advance release of CSES Module 3, variable C1009 (ID COMPONENT – RESPONDENT WITHIN ELECTION STUDY) was accidentally omitted by the CSES Secretariat for the Iceland (2009) election study. It will be restored in the next release.

In the meantime, users who wish to use C1009 for the Iceland (2009) election study can derive it from variable C1005 (ID VARIABLE – RESPONDENT), which does appear in the dataset.

Mexico (2006) and Mexico (2009) – three cases that are potentially duplicates

The Mexico (2006) election study includes 1,591 cases. The CSES Secretariat has identified that other than the respondent identification variable C1005, the following two cases are identical:

484020062004134107 and 484020062004134110

The Mexico (2009) election study includes 2,400 cases. The CSES Secretariat has identified that other than the respondent identification variable C1004, the following two sets of cases are identical:

484020090009195107 and 484020090009195109 
484020090009195108 and 484020090009195110

The CSES Secretariat does not yet know whether these potentially duplicate cases are the same respondents or different respondents, and will be investigating the issue and addressing it as necessary in a future data release. In the meantime, analysts who would be interested in deleting the one potentially duplicate case from Mexico (2006) and the two potentially duplicate cases from Mexico (2009) could use the following code to do so:

SPSS code:

SELECT IF C1005 <> "484020062004134110".
SELECT IF C1005 <> "484020090009195109".
SELECT IF C1005 <> "484020090009195110".

STATA code:

drop if C1005=="484020062004134110"
drop if C1005=="484020090009195109" | C1005=="484020090009195110"

Should users decide to drop these three potentially duplicate cases, the Mexico (2006) election study should have 1,590 cases remaining and the Mexico (2009) election study should have 2,398 cases remaining.

STATA storage types and binary-decimal precision

Users of STATA are likely to already be familiar with the binary-decimal precision issue in the storage of variables in STATA. Numbers that are provided to STATA as decimals are stored within STATA in a binary format. A decimal value that appears in the raw data as “0.67” might be read into STATA and stored in binary format as “0.67000001168930054”. This issue is well documented by STATA and on the Internet.

In the STATA dictionary “cses3_columns.dct” that CSES provides, all variables which contain decimals in the raw data file “cses3_rawdata.txt” are set in the dictionary to be stored as data type “double”. When reading the CSES dataset into STATA for the first time, STATA users may wish to consider whether for their analyses the use of the data type “double” is appropriate for each of these variables.

The CSES Secretariat cses@umich.edu would appreciate advice from the user community on ways to modify the STATA dictionary and syntax files to be optimized for use with the CSES data.

CSES Module 3 Advance Release: March 29, 2010 Version

Posted: October 24, 2010

SPSS portable files

For the convenience of users, in recent years the CSES project has been providing SPSS portable (.por) files in its data releases. However, an SPSS portable file is not available in the first advance release of CSES Module 3. This is because variable names in SPSS portable files are limited to eight characters in length, and some CSES Module 3 variables names exceed that limit. Until the CSES Secretariat is able to resolve the issue, SPSS portable files will not be provided in CSES Module 3 releases.

As an alternative, we are providing a link where you may download an SPSS system file (.sav) for the first advance release of CSES Module 3. SPSS system files do not have the variable name length limitation. The file may be downloaded here:

Mar-31-2011 update: Please note that this file has been removed and is no longer available for download, as the comparable file for the second advance release of CSES Module 3 has since been made available in a later erratum.

This file was created using SPSS Version 17, and it is approximately 2MB in size.

Once you unzip and download the SPSS system file, you may read it into SPSS using the following steps:

  1. Save the file into a location of your choice and open SPSS
  2. Go to File -> Open -> Data
  3. Select file “cses3_dataset.sav” (Note: you may need to change the file type to “all files”)

Please note that SPSS system (.sav) files are unlikely to be distributed in future releases of CSES, but are being provided as a temporary fix.