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August 22, 2007 (edited to add more papers on August 23, 2007 and September 4, 2007)

Dear Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES) colleagues,

We want to inform you about some of the papers using CSES data that will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA) in Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Panel 11-35, “Is Democracy Working? Satisfaction, Accountability and Participation in Electoral Democracies,” on Thursday, August 30 at 2:00pm contains three papers that make use of CSES. The panel is to be chaired by Ian McAllister of The Australian National University, with Pippa Norris, of the United Nations Development Programme and Harvard University, as the discussant.

  • “Citizen Information, Election Outcomes and Good Governance,” by Gabor A. Toka of the Central European University.
  • “Representation, Accountability and ‘Rational’ Electoral Behavior,” by Radoslaw Markowski of the Warsaw School of Social Psychology.
  • “Meaningful Choices, Political Supply, and Institutional Effectiveness,” by Bernhard Wessels of the Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB), and Hermann F.J. Schmitt of the University of Mannheim.

Panel 36-16, “Comparative Electoral Systems,” on Saturday, September 1 at 10:15am contains two papers that make use of CSES. The panel is to be chaired by Lawrence Ezrow of the University of Essex, with Mathieu Turgeon of the University of North Texas, and Shaun Bowler of the University of California, Riverside, as discussants.

  • “What Happens When the Rules Change? Institutional Changes and Voter Turnout,” by Gregory Love of the University of California, Davis, and Ryan E. Carlin of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
  • “Compulsory Electoral Participation and Political Legitimacy” by Sarah Birch of the University of Essex.

Panel 14-11, “Party Strategies and Electoral Systems,” on Sunday, September 2 at 8:00am also contains two papers that make use of CSES. The panel is to be chaired by Markus M. L. Crepaz of the University of Georgia, with Christian B. Jensen of the University of Iowa, and Jeffrey Stacey of Tulane University, as discussants.

  • “Institutions and Substantive Representation in Developed Democracies: The Impact of Alternative Conceptualizations and Data on the Effects of Election Rules and Party Systems” by G. Bingham Powell of the University of Rochester.
  • “Ideological Congruence and Two Visions of Democracy,” by Matt Golder of Florida State University, and Jacek Stramski of Florida State University.

These presentations, or their associated papers, also make use of CSES:

  • “Individual and Contextual Effects on Political Knowledge,” by Jason Ross Arnold of the University of Minnesota. The presentation is part of Panel 37-25, “The Impact of Education, Interest, and Knowledge on Public Opinion,” on Thursday, August 30 at 2:00pm.
  • “Political Institutions and Support for Democracy by Ethnic and Political Minorities,” by Brian D. Silver of Michigan State University, and Kathleen M. Dowley of SUNY. The presentation is part of Panel 44-14, “Democratization and Diversity,” on Thursday, August 30 at 4:15pm.
  • “Relative Extremism and Relative Moderation: Strategic Party Positioning in Democratic Systems,” by Paul V. Warwick of Simon Fraser University. The presentation is part of Panel 35-6, “Party Positioning,” on Saturday, September 1 at 8:00am.
  • “Votes for Sale?: Anti-Poverty Welfare Programs, Clientelism and Economic Voting in Mexico,” by Matthew Singer of Duke University. The presentation is part of Panel 36-18, “Economic Voting Internationally,” on Saturday, September 1 at 8:00am.
  • “A Comparative Validation of Implied and Observed Voter Utilities” by Cees van der Eijk of the University of Nottingham and Michael Marsh of Trinity College, Dublin. The presentation is part of Panel 8-8 (co-sponsored by Panel 36-1), “Methodological Advances in the Study of Elections and Voting Behavior,” on Saturday, September 1 at 2:00pm.

If your APSA presentation or paper makes use of CSES and is not listed here, please let us know and we will make sure it appears in the announcement that will follow on the CSES website, and in the CSES Bibliography.

We hope to see you at APSA!

Best regards,
-Dave
David Howell
Director of Studies
Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES)

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